What Creativity Looks Like: Meet Barb

What Creativity Looks Like: Meet Barb—come over today to read about Barb from Spencer Hill Yarn. I loved learning her perspective on creativity. :)

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Welcome back to our What Creativity Looks Like series. Every week this summer, I’ll be introducing you to some amazingly creative women. My hope is as you read these interviews and virtually meet these ladies, you’ll be inspired to create more in your own life.

Let’s get started!


What’s your name (and business name, if you have one)?

Barb Kish, Spencer Hill Naturally Dyed Yarn

Tell us about YOU. How is your creativity expressed?

I’ve sewn, knit, crocheted, and embroidered since forever. I learned to spin weave, and dye about 8-10 years ago. I’m also a musician, and started playing when I was about 10.

How did you get started in your creative practice? (“Practice” is just a fancy word for all the fun creative things you do. :))

I’m interested in interesting things. My kids at school are always asking, “How do you know about THAT?” Specifically, though, fiber and fabric seem to have enough different branches to hold my attention—not just the disciplines, but the history, science, and sociology as well. They’re all related in the end, too.

What keeps you going?

I’m a problem-solver by nature. I want to know what makes things tick.

What is your greatest joy?

Greatest? Don’t ask me to narrow that down so much, please. :-)

What Creativity Looks Like: Meet Barb—come over today to read about Barb from Spencer Hill Yarn. I loved learning her perspective on creativity. :)

What’s a “typical” day (or week) like for you? In other words, how do you incorporate creative projects into your life?

I work full-time as a public school music teacher, so I’ve been going to school since I was five. I don’t have kids of my own, so my time is my own after school. I still have to be an adult and do all those grown-up things like pay bills and buy groceries, but once those are done? No idle hands.

What would you say to someone who wants to be creative but can’t find the time?

Stop making excuses. There’s time. If you want it bad enough, you’ll find time. Other things may have to go. Decide what’s really important to you.

What do YOU think creativity looks like?

For me, it’s a sense of independence. My “color inspirations” are, “I wonder what happens when I do THIS?” Like I said, I’m a problem-solver. Sometimes the best solution is something wild and crazy, but not always. You have to be willing to see value in both. One is not intrinsically better than the other.


I’ve always loved learning how things are made, too, so I relate to Barb in that for sure. And her comment, “fiber and fabric seem to have enough different branches to hold my attention—not just the disciplines, but the history, science, and sociology as well” left me pondering the many layers of fiber and fabric so much I want to learn more. Don’t you love how you can peel more and more off of creativity and always find something new and intriguing? You can find more of Barb’s work here so be sure to visit and say, “Hello!”

Have a lovely {and creative} day!